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Bone mineral density of Korean postmenopausal women is similar between vegetarians and nonvegetarians

Authors
Kim, Mi-HyunChoi, Mi-KyeongSung, Chung-Ja
Issue Date
Oct-2007
Publisher
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Keywords
postmenopausal vegetarian women; bone mineral density; nutrient intake; isoflavone; trace minerals
Citation
NUTRITION RESEARCH, v.27, no.10, pp.612 - 617
Journal Title
NUTRITION RESEARCH
Volume
27
Number
10
Start Page
612
End Page
617
URI
https://scholarworks.sookmyung.ac.kr/handle/2020.sw.sookmyung/14627
DOI
10.1016/j.nutres.2007.07.006
ISSN
0271-5317
Abstract
The present study was performed to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD), nutrient intakes, and mineral status of postmenopausal vegetarian women in Korea. The 2 study groups consisted of postmenopausal vegetarian women (n = 76), who maintained a vegetarian diet for over 20 years, and age-matched nonvegetarian controls (n = 76). Anthropometric measurements, dietary intakes, BMDs, and urinary deoxypiridinoline excretions between the 2 groups were compared. Forty-three subjects from each group provided blood samples, and the serum mineral concentrations were analyzed. The spine and femoral neck BMDs were not significantly different between the groups. In addition, the mean daily intakes of energy, protein, and calcium were not significantly different between the groups. The vegetarians consumed significantly greater quantities of magnesium, iron, copper, and isoflavones, as well as fruits, vegetables, and soybeans, but significantly less zinc, meat, and dairy than nonvegetarians. Vegetarians had significantly lower serum levels of ferritin (P < .01), zinc (P < .001), and copper (P < .05) than the controls. Korean vegetarian postmenopausal women had similar BMD to nonvegetarians, although they had lower body weights, body mass indexes, and availabilities of trace minerals. This may be related to the fact that the vegetarians consume more fruits and vegetables and higher levels of soybeans containing isoflavones. In addition, to improve the positive action of vegetarian diets on bone, maintaining a status of mineral balance by increasing calcium, iron, and zinc intakes may be important. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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