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English in the South Korean Linguistic Landscape: Varied Patterns of Use and Statusopen accessEnglish in the South Korean Linguistic Landscape: Varied Patterns of Use and Status

Other Titles
English in the South Korean Linguistic Landscape: Varied Patterns of Use and Status
Authors
Stephen van Vlack
Issue Date
Jun-2011
Publisher
한국언어학회
Keywords
Key words: linguistic landscape; language appropriation; bilingualism; symbolism; Key words: linguistic landscape; language appropriation; bilingualism; symbolism
Citation
언어, v.36, no.2, pp.559 - 583
Journal Title
언어
Volume
36
Number
2
Start Page
559
End Page
583
URI
https://scholarworks.sookmyung.ac.kr/handle/2020.sw.sookmyung/7001
DOI
10.18855/lisoko.2011.36.2.012
ISSN
1229-4039
Abstract
Vlack, Steephen van. 2011. English in the South Korean Linguistic Landscape: Varied Patterns of Use and Status. Korean Journal of Linguistics, 36-2, 559-583. This research seeks to provide an overview of the South Korean linguistic landscape by analyzing language use in signs for business establishments in urban public spaces. A total of 1205 signs in six high-volume areas of metropolitan Seoul were documented and analyzed, specifically for their use of language. They were divided into different major categories depending on the languages present and how many. The findings suggest that English holds a special symbolic role in the linguistic landscape and is also being appropriated as a means of serving some communicative functions. English and Roman scripts are used in signs to symbolize positive affective notions (e.g., globalization, modernity, Westernization…etc.) related with the language and culture as to effectively appeal to the local community. Moreover, in contrast to South Korea’s monolingual status, English and Roman scripts are generally used more to assist the linguistic communication of Koreans, rather than to merely be resourceful to the international community. It can be argued that English has a salient status in the Korean linguistic landscape and its usage is based on the societal norms of a modern bilingual South Korea. (Sookmyung Women's Univeristy)
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특수대학원 > TESOL대학원 > 1. Journal Articles

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